Home Care Billings MT

We Offer the Following Senior Home Care Services in Billings, Montana

Companion Home Care Billings MT

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Home Care Billings MT

24 Hour Home Care and Live-In Care Billings MT

Parkinson’s Home Care in Billings MT

Personal Home Care Billings MT

Respite Home Care Billings MT

Homemaker Services Billings MT

Post-Operative Home Care in Billings MT

To Learn More About Our In-Home Care Services in Billings, MT, Watch These Short Videos:


Senior Home Care Services


Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care


24 Hour Home Care


Personal Care


Companion Care


Respite Care

Home Care Billings MT


In-Home Care for Your Loved One
Home Helpers Home Care has a very long history in assisting the elderly and our vast experience has made us cognizant of how decisions about in-home care can be so important. It is a choice with far-reaching consequences, and it is not always easy to make when aging loved ones in Billings opt for home care. And we also recognize how loved ones must find a way to juggle their other obligations with the instinct and need to look out for elderly family members. We also know that with the appropriate kind of assistance for seniors, their quality of life can be maintained and even improved. They can achieve their obligations and complete their tasks even without assistance or with the help of others, including friends, family members, and expert caregivers. Senior loved ones can stay in the homes in grace, comfort, and safety, with the right kind of help.

Home Care: Professionally Trained In-Home Care Team
Our home care services are readily available for the elderly seniors living in Billings. At Home Helpers of Billings, we do not limit our services to a single unchanging method, and we do our best to empower and support our aging elders as much as we can. Every Home Helpers caregiver is given the same high quality of training to qualify, and have had extensive experience. And we also make sure we remain pleasant and friendly when we interact with our elderly. We know how crucial it is for the emotional health of your senior loved one to have some companionship, and for us, it is an overriding priority to foster a friendly relationship between each caregiver and aging senior.

Our highly trained and highly qualified caregivers have the experience needed to provide the appropriate home care needed by your senior family member. But it isn’t just about what the caregivers know. We chose our caregivers by their genuine urge to help and care for the elderly. In fact, they truly do look forward to engaging with seniors. Their superb people skills are perfectly matched with their professionalism and high level of training. They can assist in senior loved ones on an individual basis and provide them with the help they need. And they can even work together as a team so that they can offer the proper level of home care needed by the Billings senior.

Home Helpers Home Care: Making Life Easier
We have the training, the skills, the knowledge, and the experience unsurpassed in the Billings home care industry. And so we urge you to let us help you help your aging loved ones. We want the same things for them as you do, which is for them to have a high quality of life during their later years. And that’s our pledge, which is to do everything we can for them so all their needs are met.

Browse our various pages to know more about what we offer, or feel free to contact us so we can address your concerns and answer your questions. Don’t hesitate to reach out to us, so that you can discover the improvement we can offer for your aging loved ones with the excellent home care quality from the Home Helpers of Billings.

Senior Home Care Services in Billings MT

Our senior in-home care services are also available in Laurel, Lockwood, Roundup, Huntley, Sheperd, Park City, Columbus, Red Lodge, Absarokee, Fishtail, Roberts, Worden, Joliet, Custer, Colstrip, Hysham, Molt, Roscoe, and Bridger, Montana.

Billings, Montana

Billings MT

Billings is the largest city in the U.S. state of Montana, and the principal city of the Billings Metropolitan Area with a population of 169,676. It has a trade area of over half a million people.

Billings is located in the south-central portion of the state and is the seat of Yellowstone County, which had a 2016 population of 158,980. The 2016 Census estimates put the Billings population at 111,150, making it the only city in Montana with over 100,000 people. The city is experiencing rapid growth and a strong economy; it has had and is continuing to have the largest growth of any city in Montana. Parts of the metro area are seeing hyper-growth. From 2000 to 2010 Lockwood, an eastern suburb of the city saw growth of 57.8%, the largest growth rate of any community in Montana. Billings has avoided the economic downturn that affected most of the nation 2008–2012 as well as avoiding the housing bust. With the Bakken oil development in eastern Montana and western North Dakota, the largest oil discovery in U.S. history, as well as the Heath shale oil discovery just north of Billings, the city’s growth rate stayed high during the shale oil boom. Although the city is still growing, the rate of increase has diminished markedly with oil price declines in recent years.

Billings was nicknamed the "Magic City" because of its rapid growth from its founding as a railroad town in March 1882. The city is named for Frederick H. Billings, a former president of the Northern Pacific Railroad. With one of the largest trade areas in the United States, Billings is the trade and distribution center for much of Montana east of the Continental Divide, Northern Wyoming, and western portions of North Dakota and South Dakota. Billings is also the retail destination for much of the same area. With more hotel accommodations than any area within a five-state region, the city hosts a variety of conventions, concerts, sporting events, and other rallies.

Area attractions include Pompey’s Pillar, Pictograph Cave, Chief Plenty Coups State Park, Zoo Montana, and Yellowstone Art Museum. Within 100 miles are Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, Red Lodge Mountain Resort, and the Beartooth Highway, which links Red Lodge to Yellowstone National Park.

In July 1806, William Clark (of the Lewis and Clark Expedition) passed through the Billings area. On July 25 he arrived at what is now known as Pompeys Pillar and wrote in his journal "... at 4 PM arrived at a remarkable rock ... this rock I ascended and from its top had a most extensive view in every direction." Clark carved his name and the date into the rock, leaving the only remaining physical evidence of the expedition that is visible along their route. He named the place Pompy’s Tower, naming it after the son of his Shoshone interpreter and guide Sacajawea. In 1965, Pompeys Pillar was designated as a national historic landmark and was proclaimed a national monument in January 2001. An interpretive center has been built next to the monument.

The area where Billings is today was once known as Clark’s Fork Bottom. Clark’s Fork Bottom was to be the hub for hauling freight to Judith and Musselshell Basins. At the time these were some of the most productive areas of the Montana Territory. The plan was to run freight up Alkali Creek, now part of Billings Heights, to the basins and Fort Benton on the Hi-Line.

In 1877 settlers from the Gallatin Valley area of the Montana Territory formed Coulson the first town of the Yellowstone Valley. The town was started when John Alderson built a sawmill and convinced PW McAdow to open a general store and trading post on land that Alderson owned on the bank of the Yellowstone River. The store went by the name of Headquarters and soon other buildings and tents were being built as the town began to grow. At this time before the coming of the railroad, most goods coming to and going from the Montana Territory were carried on paddle riverboats. It is believed that it was decided to name the new town Coulson in an attempt to attract the Coulson Packet Company that ran riverboats between St Louis and many points in the Montana Territory. In spite of their efforts, the river was traversed only once by paddle riverboat to the point of the new town.

Coulson was a rough town of dance halls and saloons and not a single church. The town needed a sheriff and the famous mountain man John "Liver-Eating" Johnson took the job. Many disagreements were settled with a gun in the coarse Wild West town. Soon a graveyard was needed and Boothill Cemetery was created. It was called Boothill because most of the people in it were said to have died with their boots on. Boothill Cemetery today sits within the city limits of Billings and is the only remaining physical evidence of Coulson’s existence.

When the railroad came to the area Coulson residents were sure the town would become the railroad’s hub and Coulson would soon be the Territories largest city. The railroad only had claim to odd sections and it had two sections side-by-side about two miles west of Coulson. Being able to make far more money by creating a new town on these two sections the railroad decided to create the new town of Billings, For a short time the two towns existed side-by-side with a trolley even running between the two. However, most of the residents of Coulson ended up moving to the new booming town of Billings. In the end, Coulson faded away with the last remains of the town disappearing in the 1930s. Today Coulson Park, a Billings city park, sits on the river bank where Coulson once was.

Named after Northern Pacific Railway president Frederick H. Billings, the city was founded in 1882. The Railroad formed the city as a western railhead for its further westward expansion. At first, the new town had only three buildings but within just a few months it had grown to over 2,000. This spurred Billings’ nickname of the Magic City because, like magic, it seemed to appear overnight.

The nearby town of Coulson appeared a far more likely site. Coulson was a rough-and-tumble town where arguments were often followed by gunplay. Liver-Eating Johnston was a lawman in Coulson. Perhaps the most famous person to be buried in Coulsons Boothill cemetery is Muggins Taylor, the scout who carried the news of Custer’s Last Stand to the world. Most buried here were said to have died with their boots on. The town of Coulson had been situated on the Yellowstone River, which made it ideal for the commerce that steamboats brought up the river. However, when the Montana & Minnesota Land Company oversaw the development of potential railroad land, they ignored Coulson, and platted the new town of Billings just a couple of miles to the northwest. Coulson quickly faded away; most of her residents were absorbed into Billings. Yet, for a short time, the two towns coexisted; a trolley even ran between the two. But ultimately there was no future for Coulson as Billings grew. Though it stood on the banks of the Yellowstone River only a couple of miles from the heart of present-day downtown Billings, the city of Billings never built on the land where Coulson once stood. Today Coulson Park sits along the banks of the Yellowstone where the valley’s first town once stood.

By the 1910 census, Billings’s population had risen to 10,031 ranking it the sixth fastest-growing community in the nation. Billings became an energy center in the early years of the twentieth century with the discovery of oil fields in Montana and Wyoming. Then the discovery of large natural gas and coal reserves secured the city’s rank as first in energy.

After World War II, Billings boomed into the major financial, medical and cultural center of the region. Billings has had rapid growth from its founding; in its first 50 years, growth was, at times, in the 300th and 400th percentile.

Billings’ growth has remained robust throughout the years, and in the 1950s, it had a growth rate of 66 percent.[citation needed] The 1973 oil embargo by OPEC spurred an oil boom in eastern Montana, northern Wyoming and western North Dakota. With this increase in oil production, Billings became the headquarters for energy sector companies. In 1975 and 1976, the Colstrip coal-fired generation plants 1 and 2 were completed; plants 3 and 4 started operating in 1984 and 1986.

In the 1970s and 1980s, Billings saw major growth in its downtown core; the first high-rise buildings to be built in Montana were erected. In 1980, the 22-floor Sheraton Hotel was completed. Upon its completion, it was declared "the tallest load-bearing brick masonry building in the world" by the Brick Institute of America. During the 1970s and 1980s, other major buildings were constructed in the downtown core; the Norwest Building (now Wells Fargo), Granite Tower, Sage Tower, the MetraPark arena, the TransWestern Center, many new city-owned parking garages, and the First Interstate Center, the tallest building in a five-state area.

With the completion of large sections of the interstate system in Montana in the 1970s, Billings became a shopping destination for an ever-larger area. The 1970s and 1980s saw new shopping districts and shopping centers developed in the Billings area. In addition to the other shopping centers developed, two new malls were developed, and Rimrock Mall was redeveloped and enlarged, on what was then the city’s west end. Cross Roads Mall was built in Billings Heights and West Park Plaza mall in midtown. In addition, several new business parks were developed on the city’s west end during this period.

Billings was affected by the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in May; the city received about an inch of ash on the ground. The Yellowstone fires of 1988 blanketed Billings in smoke for weeks.

In the 1990s, the service sector in the city increased with the development of new shopping centers built around big box stores such as Target, Wal Mart, and Office Depot, all of which built multiple outlets in the Billings area. With the addition of more interchange exits along I-90, additional hotel chains and service industry outlets are being built in Billings. Development of business parks and large residential developments on the city’s west end, South Hills area, Lockwood, and the Billings Heights were all part of the 1990s. Billings received the All-America City Award in 1992.

In the 21st century, Billings saw the development of operations centers in the city’s business parks and downtown core by such national companies as GE, Wells Fargo, and First Interstate Bank. It also saw renewed growth in the downtown core with the addition of numerous new buildings, new parking garages and a new MET Transit Center, and in 2002 Skypoint was completed. Downtown also saw a renaissance of the historic areas within the downtown core as building after building was restored to its previous glory. In 2007, Billings was designated a Preserve America Community. With the completion of the Shiloh interchange exit off Interstate 90, the TransTech Center was developed and more hotel development occurred as well. In 2010 the Shiloh corridor was open for business with the completion of the Shiloh parkway, a 4.8-mile (7.7 km) multi-lane street with eight roundabouts. More shopping centers were developed in the 21st century. One of the new centers is Shiloh Crossing, which brought the first Kohl’s department store to Montana. Other new centers include Billings Town Square with Montana’s first Cabela’s, and West Park Promenade, Montana’s first open-air shopping mall. In 2009, Fortune Small Business magazine named Billings the best small city in which to start a business. Billings saw continued growth with the largest actual growth of any city in Montana. On June 20, 2010 (Father’s Day), a tornado touched down in the downtown core and Heights sections of Billings. The Rimrock Auto Arena at MetraPark and area businesses suffered major damage.

While the nation has been feeling the effects of a recession, Billings’s economy has been strong. Construction and housing starts have been up as well as large investments in the community by national companies and major new road construction projects. The state’s economy is healthier than most states but as western Montana is suffering from a crash in real estate and the near demise of its timber industry, eastern Montana and North Dakota are experiencing an energy boom due to coal and the Bakken formation the largest oil discovery in U.S. history.[11][12] Billings is Montana’s oasis of economic growth. In August 2016, a 324-foot high rise complex called the One Big Sky Center was proposed for downtown Billings. If built, it would be the tallest building in Montana and Montana’s first 300 foot plus building.